Morris Fishbein – MD – AMA – The High Priest of the Liars in the Medical Profession in: Dr. Max Gerson: Healing the Hopeless

Morris Fishbein – MD – AMA – The High Priest of the Liars in the Medical Profession in: Dr. Max Gerson: Healing the Hopeless

https://www.amazon.de/Dr-Max-Gerson-Healing-Hopeless-ebook/dp/155082290X/ref=sr_1_6?s=books-intl-de&ie=UTF8&qid=1476545021&sr=1-6&keywords=gerson+biography

Amazon:

„This book tells the fascinating story of the life of Dr. Max Gerson who developed a successful dietary-based therapy for the cure of degenerative diseases, particularly cancer. Written by Gerson’s grandson, it presents a personal yet objective portrait of a unique personality who has been called „one of the most eminent geniuses in the history of medicine“ by none other than Nobel Laureate Albert Schweitzer. And yet, due to the accidents of history and deliberate suppression of his work by the medical establishment, Gerson is today not well known outside the small but growing community of alternative medicine.
The book is very well written and tells an engaging story about a subject that could easily be deathly dull or sugared with personal family recollections. To the contrary, it is a crisp, fast-moving, narrative that slows down in only a few places where lengthy sources, including some of Gerson’s writings, are quoted.
The book covers two parallel stories: First, the life of Gerson, and second, the step-by step discovery of the pieces of the therapy that bear his name.
Gerson was born in Germany (now Poland) in 1881, the son of well-to-do Jewish parents. He was the product of the world-renowned German medical universities who began his practice as a neurologist. The book portrays a reserved, sometimes shy, proud man whose intolerance for foolish and petty behavior in others often earned him a reputation for arrogance and the enmity of many colleagues. Gerson is also portrayed as an absent-minded professor of medicine who leaves the details of finances and the care of the home to his wife. His complete energy and the focus of his life was directed toward the curing of his patients.
The most interesting part of the book is reading how Gerson discovered each aspect of his therapy over a period of thirty to forty years. The story begins with the curing of his own severe migraine headaches through diet modification. Over his working career Gerson modified and perfected his therapy to embrace a widening collection of chronic degenerative diseases. He seems to have been a master of observation, a keen analyst of the works of others, and a medical pragmatist and improviser. The bottom line was that he cured diseases in patients who had been given up by conventional medicine.
Gerson’s life was not easy, and his amazing accomplishments must be measured against the barriers erected in his path. First, his life and medical practice was totally disrupted by the anti-Semitic policies of the Nazi party. He and his family fled in turn Germany, Austria, and France before settling in New York in 1936. There, in spite of his remarkable successes, the US medical establishment closed nearly all doors for Gerson to promote his ideas, to practice, and to publish his findings. One gets the feeling that the story is much worse than presented in the book, and that there existed a well-organized conspiracy within the medical industry to suppress Gerson’s work. It seems that the author is holding back from making overt accusations that seem plain to the reader based on the facts presented.
By way of qualification, the reviewer is a cured cancer patient thanks to the Gerson therapy. So the book was especially relevant and exciting for me. But I believe that anyone interested in alternative medicine and healthy living will thoroughly enjoy this book. It adds to the growing body of literature describing Gerson’s therapy, most notably Gerson „50 Cases“ and Charlotte Gerson’s „The Gerson Therapy“. In summary, this book is good reading and the engaging history of a great man.“