HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT: The Pioneering Work of FREDERICK ROBERT KLENNER, M.D.

Dr. Andrew Saul

http://www.doctoryourself.com/

​HIDDEN IN PLAIN SIGHT: The Pioneering Work of FREDERICK ROBERT KLENNER, M.D.

http://www.doctoryourself.com/klennerbio.html

http://www.doctoryourself.com/klennerpaper.html

Journal of Applied Nutrition Vol. 23, No’s 3 & 4, Winter 1971

Observations On the Dose and Administration of Ascorbic Acid When Employed Beyond the Range Of A Vitamin In Human Pathology

Frederick R. Klenner, M.D., F.C.C.P.

BoD – Buch 700:
Frederick R. Klenner, M.D., F.C.C.P.
Vitamin C against Polio – 20.000 mg Vitamin C daily

http://d.mp3vhs.de/BOAI/BoD700.pdf


Articles proving Vitamin C cures infections

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AscorbateWeb

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“Some physicians would stand by and see their patient die rather than use ascorbic acid because in their finite minds it exists only as a vitamin.” (F. R. Klenner, MD)

http://www.doctoryourself.com/klennerbio.html

…The sound barrier was broken in 1947. The Korean War began in 1950. In between was the polio epidemic of 1948-9, during which Dr. Frederick Robert Klenner cured every polio case he saw by using vitamin C.–VITAMIN C AGAINST POLIO–Claus W. Jungeblut had the initial idea; William J. McCormick was an early proponent of frequent gram-sized doses. But it was Frederick Robert Klenner who first gave polio patients tens of thousands of milligrams of vitamin C per day. He had been doing so since before D-Day.- “From 1943 through 1947,” writes Robert Landwehr , “Dr. Klenner reported successful treatment of 41 more cases of viral pneumonia using massive doses of vitamin C. From these cases he learned what dosage and route of administration – intravenously, intramuscularly, or orally – was best for each patient. Dr. Klenner gave these details in a February 1948 paper published in the Journal of Southern Medicine and Surgery entitled ‘Virus Pneumonia and Its Treatment with Vitamin C.’ (4) This article was the first of Dr. Klenner’s twenty-eight (through 1974) scientific publications.” – “When I first came across Klenner’s work on polio patients,” writes Thomas Levy, “I was absolutely amazed and even a bit overwhelmed at what I read. . . To know that polio had been easily cured and so many babies, children, and some adults still continued to die or survive to be permanently crippled by this virus was extremely difficult to accept. . . Even more incredibly, Klenner briefly presented a summarization of his work on polio at the Annual Session of the American Medical Association on June 10, 1949 in Atlantic City, New Jersey: ‘It might be interesting to learn how poliomyelitis was treated in Reidsville, N.C., during the 1948 epidemic. In the past seven years, virus infections have been treated and cured in a period of seventy-two hours by the employment of massive frequent injections of ascorbic acid, or vitamin C. I believe that if vitamin C in these massive doses – 6,000 to 20,000 mg in a twenty-four hour period – is given to these patients with poliomyelitis none will be paralyzed and there will be no further maiming or epidemics of poliomyelitis.’ Levy concludes: “The four doctors who commented after Klenner did not have anything to say about his assertions.” “How then,” asks Landwehr, “could a Dr. Fred R. Klenner, a virtually unknown general practitioner specializing in diseases of the chest, from a town no one ever heard of, with no national credentials, no research grants and no experimental laboratory, have the nerve to make his sweeping claim in front of that prestigious body of polio authorities?” Indeed, Klenner was hardly a man to mince words. “When proper amounts are used, it will destroy all virus organisms,” he would say. “Don’t expect control of a virus with 100 to 400 mg of C.” Klenner administered ascorbate by injection, and, as Lendon H. Smith describes in great detail in the Clinical Guide to the Use of Vitamin C: The Clinical Experiences of Frederick R. Klenner, M.D., Klenner found that “the most effective route was intravenous, but the intramuscular route was satisfactory. He gave at least 350 mg per kilogram of body weight.” That quantity per day is a dose of 25,000-30,000 mg or so for an adult. Yet, Smith adds, “With 350 mg per kilogram of body weight every two hours, he could stop measles and dry up chicken pox.” This is indeed a large amount of vitamin C. Such use exemplifies the modern orthomolecular physician. Klenner’s doses were enormous, flexible and symptom-driven. The sicker the patient, the higher the dose. Massive ascorbate treatment cured every one of 60 polio cases Klenner saw. He published his report in Southern Medicine and Surgery in July of 1949. (7) All patients were well in three days. None had any paralysis.

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